Tony and Nat
boil

Rip Van Winkle Brewing Company

There is quite a bit of science involved in the brewing process, but we’ve broken it down here to give you an idea as to how our delicious beers are born. We use a single infusion 7 barrel system to craft our beers, which means that each batch yields 14 ½ Kegs.

Please feel free to ask for a tour of our brewhouse!

The Brewing Process

1. Steep pre-milled grain in hot water approx. 90 minutes in Mash Tun.
2. Drain (Lauter) the sweet liquor (wort) from the Mash Tun into the Kettle.
3. Begin the boiling process which is approx. 90 – 120 minutes
4. Hops are added at various times during the boil.
5. At the end of the boil, the Wort is whirlpooled so any hop sediment will collect at the bottom center of the Kettle.
6. The liquid Wort is then pumped from the Kettle through a heat exchanger to chill the liquid.
7. The now chilled Wort is pitched into a fermentation vessel over yeast to begin the fermentation process.
8. During fermentation carbon dioxide is created as a bi-product. As the tank sits under pressure, the liquid naturally carbonates itself.
9. Once attenuation has been achieved, the temperature is lowered to  almost freezing, to put the yeast in a lethargic state.
10. The yeast then falls (flocculate) to the bottom of the vessel where it is harvested to be used again.
11. The beer is then filtered and racked into conditioning/serving vessels, and ready for consumption.

How long does it take from start to ready to drink?

Ales
Yeast ferments at warmer temps, more rapidly and consumes sugar from top of vessel to bottom. Commercially can be ready for consumption in as little as 10 – 14 days.

Lagers
Yeast ferments at colder temps, much slower and consumes sugar from the bottom up. Commercially can be ready for consumption in as little as 21 – 25 days. Of course, longer storage time is optimal for lager beer.

Yeast ferments at colder temps, much slower and consumes sugar from the bottom up. Commercially can be ready for consumption in as little as 21 – 25 days. Of course, longer storage time is optimal for lager beer.